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17 September, 2013

Flagship Romance Dazzles Orlando Crowd

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Written by: Gregory Robson
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Flagship-Romance

Last summer, revered music zine Paste wrote an article featuring the 10 Best Bands in the state of Florida. While that article is a fair representation of some of the best talent in the Sunshine State, there was one giant and glaring omission: Jacksonville Beach’s Flagship Romance. A boy-girl duo in the vein of The Civil Wars, Delta Rae and Lady Antebellum, their dual harmonies and tender slices of indie folk remain make them arguably one of the most exciting under-the-radar musical acts in not just Florida but the entire nation.

Having already supported chart-toppers such as the Goo Goo Dolls and Mumford and Sons, to name a few, the supremely polished duo is more than on their way. Seen this past Saturday at Orlando’s The Social while opening for Caitlin Crosby and Jesse Ruben, they performed what was easily the best set of the night. Whether it was the deeply impacting love song “My Jolene” or the timeless melancholy of “Games of Sorrow,” there was a palpable sense that Flagship Romance are more than worthy of wider stages and greater acclaim.

On the impassioned foot-stomper “Strange Thing” and the leave-it-all-on-the-table slow-burner “Harvest,” dual vocalists Jordyn Jackson and Shawn Fisher made the most of their all-too-brief set. Every concert has a statement moment and their ephemeral 30-minute set was a venerable call to arms for all those in the crowd. Flagship Romance will be something that much is certain, how and when they get there still remains to be seen.

Though Flagship Romance was the inarguable showstopper, the remainder of the bill wasn’t exactly a dud. Orlando native Matthew Fowler began the evening playing a confident and deft set of Damien Rice-inspired acoustic folk. Though he was visibly nervous and seemed a bit overwhelmed by the venue, his songs certainly made up for it. Be it the stripped–down version of The Cranberries ubiquitous 90s hit “Linger” or the placid fragility of “Beginners,” Fowler was equal parts ruminative, introspective and intimate. His set’s finest moment was the rising “Wear,” a song which plays off both his harmonica playing and his soaring voice.

Co-headliner Caitlin Crosby, a LA native, was arguably the Robin to Flagship Romance’s Batman. Her warm, confident and wholly accessible set vacillated gorgeously between melancholia and effervescence. Tackling dark themes such as human trafficking, drug use and narcissism, her set carried the most emotional weight. In between songs the bubbly blonde was chatty, upbeat and supremely comfortable. Highlights included the snarling blues cut “Gasoline,” the gospel-tinged Crack Me Open,” the lovelorn ballad “Consolation Prize” and the country strut of “You Make it Better.”

The last artist to take the stage was Brooklyn’s Jesse Ruben, an erudite and garrulous singer-songwriter in the vein of Matt Duke and Matt White. Though he played to a crowd of no more than 75, he did his best to keep the set entertaining. Unfortunately before the set could even gain momentum he was quickly distracted by a chatty albeit drunk couple and never once gave them a moment of peace. While it is one thing to scold listeners for cell phone use or fighting, his repeated barbs eventually derailed the set into a snarky and almost condescending character play. That is not to say that Ruben’s set was without winning moments. The soulful ballad “Different,” written for a homosexual friend, was star-making in every sense of the word. Similarly the strident “Point Me In the Right Direction” and the uplifting “We Can,” pointed towards something worth revisiting in future listens. Though much of his material mined the woes of heartbreak and failed romance, it was his non-romance songs that truly made the biggest splash.

If the evening had a true silver lining it was that the music served a greater purpose. With the exception of Fowler all three musicians performed sets in partnership with a non-profit passion project. Flagship Romance’s set was performed in support of Charity Water; Crosby’s supported The Giving Keys, while Ruben’s garnered interest for the Christopher Reeve Foundation. In an era when music appears to becoming more and more self-centered, this night of benevolence and acoustic-based songwriting was a perfect tonic from all the din and clutter that so often permeates the daily grind.